Six things you can address that cause insomnia when you have Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism

six causes of insomnia

six causes of insomnia

It seems almost everyone has insomnia these days, including, possibly, you.

People either can’t fall asleep, they wake up after a few hours of sleep and can’t go back asleep, or they aren’t able to sleep deeply. The reasons for insomnia vary from person to person, but it’s typically not due to a sleeping pill deficiency, especially if you have Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism.

Instead, the reasons behind insomnia or poor sleep can be startlingly straightforward, although addressing them may take some diet and lifestyle changes. If you have Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, they an also stem from an unmanaged thyroid condition.

In this article I’ll go over often overlooked issues that cause insomnia and poor sleep when you have Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism. Don’t assume a powerful sleeping pill is your only answer. Look at the underlying causes first and address those.

Six things that can cause insomnia when you have Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism

  1. Low blood sugar. Do you wake up at 3 or 4 a.m., racked with anxiety and unable to fall back asleep? That could be caused by a blood sugar crash, which raises stress hormones (hence the anxious wake up). Eating small but frequent meals, never skipping meals, and avoid sugary and starchy foods are important to keep blood sugar stable. Additionally, eating a little bit of protein before bed and at night if you wake up may help.
  2. High blood sugar (insulin resistance or pre-diabetes). Do you fall asleep after meals yet struggle to fall asleep at night? Do you wake up feeling like you’ve been run over by a truck, but are wide awake at bedtime? It could be high blood sugar, a precursor to diabetes, is driving your primary stress hormone cortisol and keeping you up. A telltale symptom of high blood sugar is falling asleep after meals, especially starchy meals. Minimizing sugary and starchy foods, not overeating, and exercising regularly can help you rewind insulin resistance and sleep better at night.Blood sugar issues are very common among people with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism.
  3. Too much blue light. Are you staring into a computer, phone, tablet, or TV screen right before bed? If so, you’re confusing your body’s sleep hormone production. The body recognizes blue light as daylight, which suppresses the production of melatonin, our main sleep hormone. Limiting your exposure to blue light at night can help boost your body’s production of sleep hormones. Wear orange glasses two hours before bed, use orange bulbs in your nighttime lamps, and limit your evening screen time to boost melatonin.
  4. Inflammation. If you are chronically inflamed it drives up your stress hormones, which can keep you awake. This is particularly true if you’re experiencing inflammation in your brain, which can cause anxiety. One of the most common causes of chronic inflammation is an immune reaction to foods, especially gluten, dairy, eggs, and various grains. Screening for undiagnosed food sensitivities and an anti-inflammatory diet can help you hone in on what’s causing your insomnia or poor sleep.If you are not managing the autoimmune mechanism of your Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, inflammation is going to be an ongoing issue.
  5. Hormone imbalances. Hormone imbalances can significantly impact sleep. Low progesterone, which is a common symptom of chronic stress, heightens anxiety and sleeplessness. An estrogen deficiency in perimenopause and menopause has been shown to increase anxiety, insomnia  and sleep apnea. In men, low testosterone is linked with poor sleep and sleep apnea. Also, low hormone levels can be inflammatory to the brain and increase anxiety and insomnia.
  6. Unmanaged Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism. If you are not working to manage the autoimmune component of your Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, thyroid flares may be damaging the thyroid gland and spilling excess thyroid hormone into the bloodstream. This can cause nervousness, anxiety, and insomnia. It’s important to manage your immune system when you have Hashimoto’s.

Many things can cause insomnia and poor sleep, however these are some of the more common. While you are addressing the underlying factors of your sleep issue, you can aid your ability to sleep with safe and natural compounds, depending on the mechanism. Contact me for more advice on sleeping better and managing your Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism.

Joni Labbe

About Joni Labbe

Dr. Joni Labbe is a board-certified clinical nutritionist specializing in science-based nutrition with a focus on women's health issues. She has successfully helped pre-menopausal and menopausal women regain and maintain their health since 1995. Dr. Labbe is the author of the Amazon #1 Best Selling book Thyroid & Menopause Madness and It’s Not Just Menopause: It’s Your Thyroid. She is also a professional speaker, radio personality, fitness expert, and former host of “Healthier Way With Dr. Labbe.” Dr. Labbe is one of the country’s leading authorities on thyroid disorders, including Hashimoto’s disease. Dr. Labbe has also authored numerous articles and blogs on health, nutrition, and thyroid health, as seen in Naturally Savvy, Thyroid Nation, and Fox News. She is a Board Certified Clinical Nutritionist, Doctor of Chiropractic, and has post graduate training in Functional Neurology, Functional Endocrinology, Functional Blood Chemistry Analysis, and earned a Diplomate and Fellow in Nutrition from the American Association of Integrative Medicine.

One Comment

  • Cindy Lajeunesse says:

    Can you recommend someone in the Houston, Texas area? My daughter has Hashimoto’s. She is on Unitroid 75mcg. She is struggling with sleeping at night. Seems like it’s becoming more frequent (to me). I’m at a loss as to how to help her or who to get to help her.
    Thank you,
    Cindy

Leave a Reply

*